Quantcast

Party-list reps push for parallel manual count

Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares: Manual count necessary INQUIRER.net FILE PHOTO

MANILA, Philippines—Some lawmakers are still pushing for the conduct of a parallel manual count alongside the automated ballot count.

Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares said a manual count, although tedious, expensive and time consuming, was “necessary to preserve the credibility of the elections.”

“Despite its assurances of readiness for the 2013 midterm polls, the Commission on Elections should still conduct a parallel manual count to serve as a backup should the counting machines fail, and to serve as a countercheck to the results,” said Bayan Muna Rep. Neri Colmenares.

Colmenares, vice chairman of the House Committee on Suffrage, said that while the 2010 automated election results were generally accepted by most, there remain genuine concerns about the Precinct Count Optical Scan (PCOS) machines.

A parallel count, as also suggested by other election watchdog groups, could save the polls should glitches in transmission or a breakdown of the PCOS machines take place, said Colmenares.

“In that way, we can preserve the credibility of the results of the election,” Colmenares said in a statement.

In a separate interview, he also pointed out that the machines are already three years old and most likely, not all of them would have been thoroughly tested prior to the May 13 polls.

There have also been issues with the source code, which the Comelec chief said would be open for review, but only after the elections.

The source code is the computer program that runs the PCOS machines.

ACT Teacher party list Rep. Antonio Tinio also said it would be “foolhardy” to rely on the PCOS machines alone, which was why a parallel manual count should be seriously considered.

“To trust in the PCOS machines at this point would be a foolish act of blind faith, considering Comelec’s failure to produce the source code for third party review,” Tinio said in a text message.

“Apart from Smartmatic, who can really tell what the machines are going to do with the vote count?” he insisted.

Colmenares noted that a parallel manual count would entail additional work and expenses, but that would be “a small price to pay for credible elections.”

Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Disclaimer: The comments uploaded on this site do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of management and owner of INQUIRER.net. We reserve the right to exclude comments that we deem to be inconsistent with our editorial standards.

Copyright © 2015,

To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.

Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate: c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94



News

  • British leader says UK to accept more Syrian migrants
  • Lawmaker’s wife tied to P500M pork scam denies hand in cop’s slay
  • Judges’ organizations condemn killing of Baler judge
  • Youth groups protest Surigao del Sur killings at Camp Aguinaldo
  • 10 minors reported abducted in Batangas in just 1 week
  • Sports

  • UAAP Season 78 Preview: ‘Hunted’ NU Bulldogs look to extend reign
  • Perlas promoted to Fiba Asia women’s Level I after win over India
  • Blatche delays return, will miss the rest of Jones Cup 2015
  • Etheridge: We need to show that we’re real contenders
  • Dr. Ferrari and son skip doping hearing on biathlete
  • Lifestyle

  • Circa Waves coming to Manila for the Stand For Something Tour 2015
  • The rise of luxury–but not loud–fashion brands, and away from the malls
  • MTV Video Music Awards criticized for glorifying marijuana
  • Gretchen Barretto, Heart Evangelista formally open Dr. Aivee Teo’s newest clinic
  • Many millennials see themselves as self-absorbed, wasteful–US poll
  • Entertainment

  • Rica Peralejo apologizes to nurses after St. Luke’s incident
  • Disney unveils Star Wars toys amid marketing blitz
  • Avicii tackles human trafficking in directorial debut
  • Justin Bieber bests One Direction’s Spotify record with new single
  • Everyone is royalty at Bazooka Rocks this November 28
  • Business

  • PSEi slips ahead of US jobs data
  • FPH names Francis Giles Puno new prexy
  • Max’s brings Sizzlin’ Steak to Vietnam
  • DOJ drops case against Alliance Select on opening of books
  • Del Monte Pacific sees return to profitability
  • Technology

  • The future is rad: designing brands for tomorrow
  • Wave of new Windows 10 devices on show at Berlin tech fair
  • Amateur paleontologist finds rare fossil of fish in Arizona
  • Intel putting $50 million into quantum computing research
  • Big settlement in tech wage case harks back to different era
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, September 4, 2015
  • Still under attack
  • Of orphans and prejudice
  • Why languages die
  • All in the mind
  • Global Nation

  • Lowly paid Filipinos happiest with their jobs
  • PH to China: Walk the talk, bridge gap
  • Laotian RM awardee smooth as silk
  • 2 Filipinos killed, 2 hurt in Salinas domestic violence shootings
  • New USAID mission chief vows to keep development thrust in PH 
  • PHOTOS AND VIDEOS