Quantcast

Mexican photojournalist found dead after kidnapping

View of a picture of slain Mexican photojournalist Edgar Daniel Castro displayed in front of the government’s palace during a demonstration to demand justice for his murder, in San Luis Potosi, Mexico on October 6, 2017.
Castro was kidnapped from his house by gunmen and was found dead on Friday in San Luis Potosi. AFP PHOTO / YURI CORTEZ

MEXICO CITY — A photojournalist who received threats over his work has been found dead in northern Mexico a day after he was kidnapped, officials said Friday, making him the 11th journalist killed in the country this year.

The government’s Mechanism to Protect Journalists and Rights Activists called for an “immediate and effective investigation” into the killing of Edgar Daniel Esqueda Castro, 23, who was reportedly kidnapped Thursday by gunmen posing as police officers in the city of San Luis Potosi.

There were immediate protests in Mexico, which drug wars and corruption have made one of the most dangerous countries in the world for the press, according to rights groups.

Esqueda’s body was found dumped near the San Luis Potosi airport, bound and bearing signs of torture, according to local media reports and the rights group Reporters Without Borders.

His wife told the press freedom watchdog that gunmen claiming to be police had burst into their home while they slept early Thursday, thrown Esqueda to the floor and then hauled him away at gunpoint.

Prosecutors said Thursday that no actual police were suspected in the crime.

But San Luis Potosi Governor Juan Manuel Carreras told a press conference Friday that one line of investigation included the possible involvement of “public officials.”

The federal protection program said Esqueda, who worked for the daily newspaper Metropoli San Luis and the news website Vox Populi, had recently told authorities that state police had threatened and harassed him while he was working.

He said five police officers had threatened to beat him up and take his camera while he photographed the scene of a shootout on July 4, forcing him to delete his photos.

Nine days later, police reportedly harassed him again, saying they “would be watching him” because they suspected he was “passing information to the bad guys,” the federal protection program said in a statement.

The program had asked local authorities to grant Esqueda protective measures.

But it is unclear whether he was ever given any of the measures offered by the program, such as security cameras, panic buttons or bodyguards. The interior ministry did not immediately respond to a request for information.

The protection program, launched in 2012, has been widely criticized for failing to stop the murders of journalists and activists.

‘Enough already’

Colleagues of the slain photojournalist protested in San Luis Potosi after his body was found, placing their cameras on the ground atop handwritten signs reading “Enough already” and “Justice.”

The Latin America director for Reporters Without Borders, Emmanuel Colombie, condemned the “hateful crime,” calling on authorities to punish Esqueda’s killers and protect his family.

Rights groups say at least 11 journalists have been killed in Mexico so far in 2017. That would put this year on a par with last as the deadliest ever for journalists in Mexico.

It is unclear whether they were all targeted because of their work, but most of them had been reporting on drug cartels or political corruption.

Recent Stories:

Complete stories on our Digital Edition newsstand for tablets, netbooks and mobile phones; 14-issue free trial. About to step out? Get breaking alerts on your mobile.phone. Text ON INQ BREAKING to 4467, for Globe, Smart and Sun subscribers in the Philippines.

Disclaimer: The comments uploaded on this site do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of management and owner of INQUIRER.net. We reserve the right to exclude comments that we deem to be inconsistent with our editorial standards.

Copyright © 2017,

To subscribe to the Philippine Daily Inquirer newspaper in the Philippines, call +63 2 896-6000 for Metro Manila and Metro Cebu or email your subscription request here.

Factual errors? Contact the Philippine Daily Inquirer's day desk. Believe this article violates journalistic ethics? Contact the Inquirer's Reader's Advocate. Or write The Readers' Advocate: c/o Philippine Daily Inquirer Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines Or fax nos. +63 2 8974793 to 94



News

  • Approaching typhoon brings heavy rain, wind to election-day Japan
  • Former US presidents call for unity at hurricane aid concert
  • Abe eyes big win as Japan votes under North Korea threats
  • Aegis Juris fratman may ‘rot’ in detention – Zubiri
  • Angry worker pummels, kills peer with 15-kilo barbell
  • Sports

  • Gasol, Grizzlies build big lead, hang on to beat Warriors
  • Streak over: Magic end 17-game skid to Cavs
  • Hot World Series on deck: Altuve, Astros vs Kershaw, Dodgers
  • Astros beat Yankees, reach World Series
  • Cavs’ Derrick Rose out with sprained ankle
  • Lifestyle

  • From ramen to cactus smoothies, millennial pink food catches on in Singapore
  • LOOK: ‘Water dress’ captured by Japanese photographer without CGI
  • Her husband calls his ex ‘my little pumpkin’
  • My whole new world at Hong Kong Disneyland
  • Cebu teens’ runway debut platform marks 7th year
  • Entertainment

  • Mark Ruffalo vows never to catcall women again, calls on men to stop rape culture
  • Netizens want Super Junior’s Siwon to quit show after dog bite death
  • Rivermaya is back with a fresh serving of ‘no rules’ rock songs
  • LOOK: Nico Bolzico gets serious about how much he adores Solenn Heussaff’s artistry
  • PH’s ‘Bomba’ wins in Warsaw film fest
  • Business

  • Bigger market eyed for fully farmed tuna in Japan
  • COL Financial gets Wednesday deadline for full report on ‘breach’
  • Privacy watchdog ‘monitoring 24/7’ COL Financial’s data hack probe
  • Helping other women is the icing on her cake
  • Mr. Wash goes to Club Mwah
  • Technology

  • ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ new arcade game has got ‘more moves, cool attacks’
  • Hackers offered $1K to expose bugs on Google Play apps
  • Japanese company sues Apple for ‘Animoji’ trademark
  • Google firm flies balloons to deliver internet, cellphone signals in devastated Puerto Rico
  • The secret to curing dyslexia lies in the eyes, scientists say
  • Opinion

  • The high price of political incompetence
  • Editorial cartoon, October 22, 2017
  • To go home to Marawi
  • The romanticism of a ‘revolutionary’ government
  • A warm welcome home
  • Global Nation

  • Flights to Japan, Taiwan cancelled Sunday
  • Palace slams Inter-Parliamentary Union for ‘meddling’ in De Lima case
  • Bello urges OFWs to invest in bank created for them
  • FBI confirms Hapilon’s death through DNA test — Lorenzana
  • Trillanes: I can’t stop Trump’s visit
  • PHOTOS AND VIDEOS

    • Poll: Most dislike NFL protests and Trump comments

      Read More

    • Former Mexico governor wanted in US arrested

      Read More

    • US: Nobel Peace choice doesn’t change US stance

      Read More

    • California becomes first ‘sanctuary state’ for undocumented migrants

      Read More

    • Mexican photojournalist found dead after kidnapping

      Read More

    • Moscow gets 130 fake bomb calls, evacuates 100,000 people

      Read More

    • Frustrated police appeal for public’s help in Vegas case

      Read More

    • US states declare emergency ahead of Tropical Storm Nate

      Read More

    • Trump’s one-two punch hits birth control, LGBT rights

      Read More

    • Maute terror base overrun; priest rescued

      Read More

    • CHR execs rebut Duterte: Gascon not a pedophile

      Read More

    • De Lima on Estrada’s bail: We may as well decriminalize plunder

      Read More

    • Army whistle-blower now in hiding

      Read More

    • Quezon gov’t sees no need to declare state of calamity

      Read More

    • Anonymous no more: Woman hero of revolution vs US

      Read More