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Princess Di’s fave bag–and now Kate Middleton’s–gets new shape

For footwear, women needn’t sacrifice height for comfort as Tod’s rolls out ‘flatforms,’ suede sandals with an almost even, two-inch elevation

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1:59 am | Friday, February 8th, 2013

Princess Diana and her D-Bag–before it was called a D-Bag

The 25-million-euro Tod’s-funded restoration of the Roman Colosseum is under way. And on the heels of its investment in Rome’s history, the Italian luxury leather goods house is also preserving its legacy with the funding of a book celebrating the iconic style of Tod’s’ unofficial poster girl, Princess Diana.

 

The late royal was frequently photographed both in her official duties and private time carrying a practical-looking nude beige tote, later renamed the D-Bag in her honor.

 

“As you can see, she even carried it to the gym,” said Annie Chan, senior PR associate of Tod’s Hong Kong, while flipping through several pages of blown-up photos of Diana, at the Tod’s Spring-Summer 2013 presentation at The Peninsula Manila last week. Diana also wore Tod’s’ popular driving shoes, the Gommino.

 

The book, which will be launched in March in Milan, is being published by an Italian firm, Chan said.

 

a suede “flatform” sandal

Diana’s favorite purse has undergone several transformations since it was christened the D-Bag in 1997 following her death. A new, softer shape has even been seen on Kate Middleton, wife of Diana’s son, Prince William. The Duchess of Cambridge joins celebrities like Nicole Kidman, Charlize Theron, Anne Hathaway and Naomi Watts as fans of the bag.

 

This season, the iconic satchel assumes a new styled shape—a slightly flared, wing-like top that has been seen on some of the popular bag styles of late. But unlike its counterparts that have a more structured form, the new D-Bag’s wings softly droop to the side.

 

It comes in classic calf as well as python. Tod’s is also releasing a Couture Collection for the D-Bag this season, one-off pieces that feature leather cutouts as well as tiny draped chains.

 

TOD’S D-Bag in pink python

So how does one keep a purse of light-colored skin like Diana’s impeccably clean and spot-free?

 

“You don’t,” said Chan. “You allow it to age naturally and get that patina.”

 

Rare brand

 

Tod’s is a rare brand in that it doesn’t roll out styles that consumers go crazy over, only to be ditched after just a season or two, when a new hot thing comes along. It sticks to its classic shapes and styles, tweaking a little here and there for some update every season. It’s a tack that seems to be working.

 

gingham-printed suede Gommino loafers

For footwear, women needn’t sacrifice height for comfort, as Tod’s rolls out “flatforms”—suede sandals with an almost even, two-inch elevation, alongside Mary Jane flats of perforated leather. Notable, too, are the candy-striped satin smoking shoes that also come in candy-colored suede with black piping and the signature gommini nubs.

 

The classic Gommino also comes in gingham-printed suede, and embossed leather loafers with contrast-color soles. (One has cheeky bright-scarlet soles that, we thought, would be the kind that just might tick off Mr. Louboutin.)

 

Men’s footwear also gets a splash of color. It has a set of suede wingtips in cobalt, mustard and red. Interestingly, there’s a wingtip, calf-leather sneaker style (in blue and dark brown) with thick soles that could give a boost to the vertically challenged Filipino male.

 

Tod’s also has new colorful document folders and gadget cases that may appeal to both men and women alike.

 

Tod’s is at Greenbelt 4, Makati City, exclusively distributed by Stores Specialists Inc.


Tags: Comfort , fashion , footwear , Lifestyle , Shoes , Tod’s

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